Biblical Illuminations
Sermon illustrations,
object lessons, and
teaching ideas.

Malice, Deceit, and a High School Basketball Tournament

Posted by Douglas Twitchell on Mar 3, 2006
A week ago I was teaching our youth group from I Peter 2:1-3, in which Peter tells us to put aside (among other things) malice.
I told the teens that having malice in your heart is like being fitted with the wrong prescription eyeglasses. Nothing looks right to you, and you never see things as they really are. People who are filled with bitterness and malice never see the world as it really is; they see it in the way that best feeds their bitterness, and allows their malice to fester.

Today I saw a perfect example of that. Our youth group went to a high school boys' basketball tournament between the Christian Academy in our area and another Christian Academy in the state (which I will leave nameless).

When our boys were running out onto the court to be introduced, a woman - through no fault of her own - walked unsuspectingly into the path of our team, and the situation was such that neither she nor they saw the other in time to avoid a collision.

The woman was knocked to the floor, and was knocked unconscious. 911 was called, and the woman was taken to the hospital (before she left she had regained consciousness, and was coherent, and had full mobility).

Our boys were just standing around with that "deer-in-the-headlights" look when they realized what had happened, until it became obvious that there was nothing they could do, and were sent to begin warming up for the game.

But I happened to be sitting in the bleachers right in the middle of a group of fans from the other school. Not a big deal, right? I mean, we are a group of Christians, and we can maintain cordial relationships, even in the midst of a sporting event. Right?

Tragically, that was not the case. The group sitting behind us personally knew the woman who was knocked down, and became enraged over the accident. One woman, who (by the testimony of her own mouth) didn't even see what happened, within minutes of the accident was telling all her friends about how "That boy who knocked her down just kept right on going and never stopped to see if she was alright."

Blatantly not true.

"He's laughing about the whole thing. What a jerk."

Likewise not true.

"That whole team is a bunch of jerks. They're so stuck on themselves."

"I hope God makes them lose this game. Serves them right."

"I hope that boy gets hurt. If I get a chance, I'm going to go punch him in the face."

And in the area of the bleachers where we were sitting, we actually had fans around us cheering and laughing when "that boy" was fouled and knocked to the floor.

Honestly, I was embarrassed and ashamed to be sitting in the middle of such an ungodly display of malice and deceit. The viciousness of the woman's slander was disgraceful. But as I thought about it, I realized that, although this woman was spewing out blatantly false statements about the boys on our team, she probably didn't even realize she was doing it.

Though she didn't see what happened, she latched on to the story that would feed her malicious anger, and because malice prevents you from seeing things as they really are...I think this woman actually believed the story she had invented, and was spewing out to all her friends.

Tragic. But it was exactly what I had told our teens about the week before.

It's easy to shake our heads in disgust at stories like that, and think "I would never be like that", but in reality, everyone of us has probably - at some time or another - let our anger, our malice, our bitterness and rage, cloud our view of events, and destroy our ability to perceive things as they really are.




Where to Go from Here...

Read more: Bitterness, Integrity, Anger
Share:
Subscribe:
Facebook: Like us to get updates!
Search: